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SSI and Social Security Disability Lawyers in Waltham

SSI and Social Security Disability Lawyers in Waltham

SSI and Social Security Disability Lawyers in Waltham

1601 Trapelo Rd., Suite 174
Waltham, MA 02451


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SSI and Social Security Disability Lawyers in Waltham

Don't try to go through the Social Security claims process alone. Whether you’re struggling with your finances, are disabled, or are considering retiring soon, you probably need help navigating the Social Security system. Because Social Security plays such an important role in planning for your future, it's important to understand how the program works and what you need to do to qualify for benefits. Morgan & Morgan’s SSI and Social Security Disability Lawyers in Waltham can help you navigate the process of applying for benefits and appealing a denial of benefits. We will work closely with you to build a strong case for your entitlement to benefits, and we will fight tirelessly to get you the coverage you need. 

Contact Morgan & Morgan today to schedule a free case evaluation.

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FAQ

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  • Why Do You Need a Social Security Lawyer?

    1. Millions of people apply for social security benefits each year. A significant percentage of these claims are initially denied. If you are denied benefits, you have the right to file an appeal, but the process can be challenging. In other words, you need all the help you can get.
    2. The application and appeals process is complicated. There are multiple levels of appeal: reconsideration, a hearing with an administrative law judge, a review by the Appeals Council, and a review in federal court. A lawyer can help you navigate these waters and give you the best chance of success.
    3. Even if you are approved for benefits, the amount you receive may be too low to live on. A lawyer can help you get the most out of your social security disability benefits and make sure you are getting what you deserve.
    4. You may be entitled to other benefits as well. If you are disabled, you may also be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or other government programs.
    5. If your disability is work-related, you may be entitled to workers’ compensation as well as social security disability benefits. A lawyer can help you get the benefits you deserve from both programs.

    Hiring a social security lawyer does not guarantee that your claim will be approved, but it does increase your chances of success. If you are having trouble navigating the social security system, then hiring a lawyer may be the best course of action for you.

  • Whata are The Types of Social Security Benefits?

    There are two programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). To be eligible for either program, you must have previously worked in jobs that are covered by Social Security to earn enough work credits.

    SSDI

    There are many different types of disabilities that can qualify someone for social security disability benefits. Disabilities can be physical, mental, or a combination of both. A physical disability is a medical condition preventing you from doing physical work. A mental disability is a medical condition preventing you from being able to understand, remember, or make decisions.

    Some examples of physical disabilities that could qualify someone for social security disability benefits include blindness, deafness, Lou Gehrig's disease, cancer, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, and paralysis. Some examples of mental disabilities that could qualify someone for social security disability benefits include Alzheimer's disease, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, depression, schizophrenia, and autism.

    If your application for social security disability benefits is denied, you have the right to appeal the decision.

    Social Security Retirement Benefits

    To qualify for Social Security retirement benefits, you must first have worked in jobs covered by Social Security. Then you must have earned enough "credits" to qualify—40 credits. You can earn up to four credits each year.

    The earliest you can start receiving retirement benefits is age 62 for reduced benefits. The full retirement age is between 65 and 67, depending on the year you were born. You can choose to receive benefits as early as age 62, but doing so may result in a permanently reduced benefit amount.  If you wait until after your full retirement age to claim Social Security retirement benefits, your benefit will increase.

    What Is Supplemental Security Income?

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs-based program that provides financial assistance to eligible low-income adults and children who are blind or have another disability. The SSI program is overseen by the Social Security Administration, but it is funded through general tax revenue rather than Social Security taxes.

    To be eligible for SSI, individuals must meet certain criteria regarding their income, resources, and citizenship status. Additionally, they must be age 65 or older, or they must be under the age of 65 and have a disability that is expected to last for at least one year or result in death.

    How Much Money Can You Get From Supplemental Security Income?

    The amount of money an individual can receive from SSI benefits depends on several factors, including the recipient's living situation and any income they may receive from other sources. For example, an individual who lives with others may have their SSI payment reduced if someone else in their household is also providing financial support.

    Additionally, SSI payments may be reduced if the recipient has income from other sources, such as employment, child support, or gifts from friends or family members. However, there are certain types of income that will not reduce an individual's SSI payment, such as food stamps, housing assistance, and most need-based state or local public benefits programs.

    What Are the Restrictions on Supplemental Security Income?

    There are some restrictions on how recipients can use their Supplemental Security Income benefits. For example, recipients are not allowed to use their benefits to buy alcohol or drugs. Additionally, SSI payments may be reduced or discontinued if the recipient moves out of the country or fails to cooperate with medical evaluations or work incentive programs.

  • What Are Social Security Benefits? Is That Different Than SSI and SSDI?

    Many people mistakenly believe that Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security are the same thing. Although both programs provide financial assistance to people with disabilities, there are several important ways in which they differ. Here's a brief overview of the primary differences:

    • Social security benefits are available to retired workers and their spouses as well as to widows, widowers, and their dependent children. Supplemental security income is only available to those who are aged, blind, or disabled.
    • You may be able to get both social security benefits and supplemental security income payments, but the amount you receive from each will be based on different criteria.
  • Why Would SSI or SSDI Benefits Be Denied?

    Although Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs-based program, there are still some reasons why your claim might be denied. Here are 4 of the most common reasons for denial and what you can do to avoid them.

    1. You Have Excess Resources

    One of the eligibility requirements for SSI is that your countable resources must be below $2,000 for an individual or $3,000 for a couple. Your countable resources include things like cash, checking and savings accounts, stocks, and bonds. If you have excess resources, your SSI claim will be denied.

    2. You Didn't Follow the Social Security Administration's Orders

    One of the conditions of receiving SSDI is that you must agree to cooperate with the SSA for them to determine your disability. This includes things like going to doctor's appointments and physical or mental examinations when asked.

    If you don't follow the SSA's orders, your benefits may be suspended or terminated. In some cases, your claim might even be denied from the start.

    3. You Make Too Much Money

    In order to qualify for SSI, your income must fall below certain limits set by the SSA. If you make too much money from working or from other sources, your SSI claim will be denied.

    4. You Didn't Give the SSA Enough Information

    When you apply for SSI, the SSA will need certain information about you in order to process your claim. This includes things like birth certificates, tax returns, bank statements, and medical records. If you don't provide the SSA with everything they need, your claim might be delayed or denied altogether.

  • Morgan & Morgan Can Help

    There are many good reasons to hire us to help you with your social security application. First and foremost, we have a great deal of experience and knowledge in this area. We know the ins and outs of the system, and we can guide you through the process quickly and efficiently. Additionally, we are very familiar with the required paperwork and the deadlines involved. This can save you a lot of time and frustration. Finally, we offer a high level of personal service. Our SSI and social security disability lawyers in Waltham will take the time to get to know you and your situation, and we will work tirelessly to get you the benefits you deserve.

    Contact Morgan & Morgan to schedule a free case evaluation to learn more about how we can help you with your social security process.

Last updated on Oct 19, 2022