What Is a Statute of Limitations?

What Is a Statute of Limitations? - judge book

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At Morgan and Morgan, we frequently get asked questions about the statute of limitations for numerous specific claims, so here are some of those answers. A statute of limitations is a law that sets a limit on the time individuals have to initiate legal proceedings when they have disputes. The laws apply to both civil and criminal proceedings. Every state or jurisdiction has its own rules concerning the length of time allowed. Additionally, statutes of limitations will vary depending on the type of offense or wrongdoing.

Once the time period has expired for any specific statute of limitations, there is no recourse for filing legal proceedings against alleged wrongdoers. There are a few exceptions, but these exceptions are for specific cases and will vary depending on the jurisdiction. Some statutes are defined by legislation, while a matter of common law specifies others.

What Is the Reasoning Behind Statutes of Limitations?

Understandably, people want justice after being wronged. However, there are practical reasons why statutes of limitations exist in our legal system. The core reason is to prevent potential defendants from being unfairly subjected to legal actions.

One of the main concerns proponents of statutes of limitations is that over time, key evidence can get lost or discarded that a potential defendant would need to use to defend themselves. If the evidence has disappeared, this could lead to a miscarriage of justice. 

Another critical reason is that eyewitness testimony may not be as reliable after a long period of time. Crucial details can slip away from an eyewitness's memory, or they may remember differently than what actually occurred. It's not reasonable to expect someone to recall specifics of an incident that may have taken place years or even decades prior. For example, would you be able to accurately remember what you were wearing on a Thursday morning two years ago? Additionally, eyewitnesses may become incapacitated or die after years. 

Statutes of limitations also ensure people use reasonable diligence in their pursuit of justice. It blocks people from abusing the legal system to harass others by filing lengthy, drawn-out lawsuits. 

Except for some criminal acts, our justice system also supports that punishing offenders for something that occurred in the distant past would be unjust. Lastly, statutes of limitations are in place to ease the court's burden. The Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System reported there are 100 million cases filed in state trial courts each year and 400,000 filed in federal trial courts. There are about 30,000 state judges and 1,700 federal judges that have to handle those. 

What Is the Discovery Rule?

The normal statute of limitations for civil claims can sometimes be extended by the discovery rule depending on the state, circumstances, and what type of claim it is. It's a rule of common law that indicates the time clock should actually start running when the victim discovers or should have reasonably discovered they were injured or suffered losses. 

Each state has laws governing what kind of cases are subject to the discovery rule and the maximum time allowable. Frequently the discovery rule is used in medical malpractice cases. Still, it can also apply to issues with personal injuries, product liability claims, and contracts. 

What Else Is There to Know About Statutes of Limitations?

Most states have laws pertaining to injuries that are suffered by minors. The clock typically doesn't start ticking until they are 18 or older. Additionally, filing claims and lawsuits against government entities have their own time limits, which are typically much shorter.

We understand that when you are personally wronged in some way, a statute of limitations doesn't seem fair, but these laws benefit society as a whole. If you have any questions about the statute of limitations in your state for a specific case, don't hesitate to reach out to us at Morgan and Morgan. Below is a list of the statutes of limitations in all states for common civil cases.

Laws regarding Statute of Limitations change frequently and individual state laws may vary from year to year. The accuracy or completeness of the information provided is not warranted or guaranteed.

View This By State

Alabama

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years from the date of the incident
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited. Action must be taken within one year of the discovery.

View AL State Bar’s Website here.

Alaska

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes, however, action must be taken within ten years regardless.

View AK State Bar’s Website here.

Arizona

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, three for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View AZ State Bar’s Website here.

Arkansas

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, three for oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Libel is three years, slander is two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discover rule: Yes

View AR State Bar’s Website here.

California

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four years for written, two for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery Rule: Yes

View CA State Bar’s Website here.

Colorado

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View CO State Bar’s Website here.

Connecticut

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four years for written, three for oral
  • Product liability: Three
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View CT State Bar’s Website here.

Delaware

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written, two for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Three years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View DE State Bar’s Website here.

Florida

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Four years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, four for oral
  • Product liability: Four years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Four years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View FL State Bar’s Website here.

Georgia

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, four for oral
  • Product liability: Ten years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing:
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View GA State Bar’s Website here.

Hawaii

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years 
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View HI State Bar’s Website here.

Idaho

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, four for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice:  Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View ID State Bar’s Website here.

Illinois

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten years for written, five for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Five years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Five years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View IL State Bar’s Website here.

Indiana

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Two to ten years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View IN State Bar’s Website here.

Iowa

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten years for written, five for oral
  • Product liability: Two to 15 years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Five years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Five years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View IA State Bar’s Website here.

Kansas

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, three for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View KS State Bar’s Website here.

Kentucky

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: One year
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Fifteen years for written, five for oral
  • Product liability: One year
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Five years
  • Medical malpractice: One year
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Five years
  • Wrongful death: One year from the date the deceased personal representative is appointed or two years from the date of the person's death if a personal representative is appointed more than one year after the date of death.
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View KY State Bar’s Website here.

Louisiana

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: One year
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten years for written and oral
  • Product liability: One year
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: One year
  • Medical malpractice: One year
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: One year
  • Wrongful death: One year from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View LA State Bar’s Website here.

Maine

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Six years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four, six, or 20 years for written contracts, four or six years for oral.
  • Product liability: Six years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death, six years in the case of homicide.
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View ME State Bar’s Website here.

Maryland

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Five years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MD State Bar’s Website here.

Massachusetts

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: 20 years for written, six for oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: Three years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MA State Bar’s Website here.

Michigan

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MI State Bar’s Website here.

Minnesota

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, four for oral
  • Product liability: Six years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Four years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MN State Bar’s Website here.

Mississippi

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MS State Bar’s Website here.

Missouri

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Five years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Five years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Five years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Five years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MO State Bar’s Website here.

Montana

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Eight years for written, five years for oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years with a maximum of five
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View MT State Bar’s Website here.

Nebraska

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Four years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four or five years for written contracts, four years for oral.
  • Product liability: Four years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Four years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NE State Bar’s Website here.

Nevada

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, four for oral.
  • Product liability: Four years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NV State Bar’s Website here.

New Hampshire

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written and oral contacts
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: Three years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Six years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NH State Bar’s Website here.

New Jersey

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six and four years
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NJ State Bar’s Website here.

New Mexico

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, four for oral contacts
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Four years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: Three years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NM State Bar’s Website here.

New York

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral contracts
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two-and-a-half years; foreign body inpatient, one year
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View NY State Bar’s Website here.

North Carolina

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years or more after the occurrence of the last act of the defendant, a maximum of four years.; damages by reason of a foreign object left in body; one year upon discovery, maximum ten years.
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View NC State Bar’s Website here.

North Dakota

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Six years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Six years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Six years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View ND State Bar’s Website here.

Ohio

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Eight years for written, six for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: One year to give notice which extends time 180 days after notice, a maximum of four years.
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View OH State Bar’s Website here.

Oklahoma

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, three for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View OK State Bar’s Website here.

Oregon

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral contracts
  • Product liability: Three to ten years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years from act of reasonable discovery, a maximum of five years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years from discovery
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View OR State Bar’s Website here.

Pennsylvania

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View PA State Bar’s Website here.

Rhode Island

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten and four years
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Ten years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Ten years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View RI State Bar’s Website here.

South Carolina

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Three years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Six years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years from the act (i.e., doctor's care) or the date the harm should reasonably have been discovered, with a maximum time limit of six years. If a foreign object is left in the body, the time limit is two years. 
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View SC State Bar’s Website here.

South Dakota

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four, six, and 20 years for written, four or six years for oral contracts.
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: No

View SD State Bar’s Website here.

Tennessee

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: One year
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Six to ten years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: One year
  • Libel and slander: One year for libel, six months for slander
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: One year from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View TN State Bar’s Website here.

Texas

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years; 30 years for child sex abuse and five years for sex crimes.
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Four years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View TX State Bar’s Website here.

Utah

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Four years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, four for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years after discovering or reasonably should have discovered the injury caused by the medical provider, but not more than four years from the date of the incident.
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Cases for the wrongful death must be brought within two years or one year if against a city, town, or county government.
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View UT State Bar’s Website here.

Vermont

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years from the date of the incident or two from reasonable discovery, a maximum of seven years.
  • Libel and slander: Three years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View VT State Bar’s Website here.

Virginia

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Five years for written, and three years for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Five years
  • Medical malpractice: One to two years, ten years maximum
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View VA State Bar’s Website here.

Washington

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written, three years for oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Three years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years from the date of injury or one year upon discovery with a maximum of eight years.
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Three years
  • Wrongful death: Three years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View WA State Bar’s Website here.

West Virginia

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Two years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten years for written, five years for oral
  • Product liability: Two years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Two years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Two years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Limited

View WV State Bar’s Website here.

Wisconsin

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Three years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Six years for written and oral
  • Product liability: Three years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Six years
  • Medical malpractice: Three years from the date of the incident or one year from discovery with a maximum of five years.
  • Libel and slander: Two years
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Six years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View WI State Bar’s Website here.

Wyoming

  • Personal injury due to negligence or intentional harm: Four years
  • Breach of an oral or written contract: Ten years for written, eight years for oral
  • Product liability: Four years
  • Property damage from negligence or purposeful wrongdoing: Four years
  • Medical malpractice: Two years
  • Libel and slander: One year
  • Fraud and misrepresentation: Four years
  • Wrongful death: Two years from the date of the decedent's death
  • Discovery rule: Yes

View WY State Bar’s Website here.