Orlando Woman Charged in Crash that Killed Motorcyclist

An Orlando woman has been charged after striking a motorcycle from behind, killing the 25-year-old driver, according to recent reports. Yetta Maritza Ospina, 27, was driving her 2011 Toyota Corolla northbound on the John Young Parkway near Oak Ridge Road in Orlando when she hit Peter Vergari’s Honda motorcycle from behind, causing it to overturn and eject the rider. Vergari ended up on the inside lane of State Road 423, and died at the scene. According to the Orlando Sentinel, Ospina has been arrested on charges of DUI manslaughter and vehicular homicide.

Two samples of Ospina’s breath revealed blood alcohol content (BAC) readings of .158 and .166, significantly more than the .08 allowed under Florida law. In addition to driving under the influence, Ospina was also reportedly not using her headlights, despite it being 2:50am in the morning. It is reported that she had been invited to a downtown Orlando club where her and five other women split two bottles of Hpnotiq, which is a blend of vodka, fruit juice, and cognac.

Contrary to popular belief, motorcyclists are not the cause of a majority of the accidents they are involved in. Because of their small size, many drivers do not recognize them in traffic or are careless when they are around. Due to their small size and the relative lack of protection they provide to the rider, motorcyclists often experience significant injuries when they are involved in a crash. According to the groundbreaking “Hurt Report,” motorcyclists hold a 98% chance of injury when involved in a crash. Though motorcycles only account for 2% of the vehicle registration in the United States, they account for a surprising 10% of the country’s annual motor vehicle casualties.

If you or a loved one is involved in a motorcycle accident, the victim may be able to file a lawsuit against another driver, company, or agency that may have contributed to the accident. Victims of these kinds of accidents may be able to recover compensation for medical bills, lost wages, and pain and suffering. To find out if you may have legal recourse, fill out the free case review form on the right.

By Staff

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