Popcorn Lung

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Workers at food manufacturing plants producing popcorn flavoring potentially could have damaged their lungs. The chemical diacetyl, which is an ingredient in certain popcorn flavoring, can be dangerous when inhaled.

According to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, diacetyl is a natural compound that gives butter its taste and is also found in cheese and wine. The Food and Drug Administration has approved the chemical as an acceptable flavor agent, but countless workers claiming lung damage have still been suing flavoring manufacturers over the years.

“Popcorn lung,” formally known as bronchiolitis obliterans, is caused by extensive exposure to the toxins found in diacetyl. The airway branches of the lungs, with popcorn lung, are blocked by granulation tissue. Some of the symptoms of popcorn lung disease that people have experienced include:

  • Gasping for air
  • Dry cough
  • Wheezing
  • Night sweats
  • Severe irritation of the skin and eyes
  • Hardening of the lung tissue

The damage caused by the inhalation of diacetyl is irreparable. The most serious instances of popcorn lung are life-threatening, and victims who have reached this point likely need a lung transplant to survive.

There have also been recent reports that diacetyl has been found in various e-cigarette flavors, causing a serious risk for e-cigarette users.

The latest reports concerning popcorn lung are coming from consumers of microwave popcorn. If you or your loved ones eat butter-flavored microwave popcorn and are experiencing respiratory problems, you may be at risk for popcorn lung disease. Find more extensive information about Morgan & Morgan’s popcorn lung disease lawsuits. Our lawyers are no longer taking claims for this class action case.